NORTH END LANDING + JAMES NORTH BAPTIST CHURCH – Hamilton, ON

Mixed Use Award (Sponsored by Enbridge Gas Inc.)

Invizij Architects Inc.

Jury Comments: That this underused brownfield site has been transformed into a valuable community asset including Passive House certified social housing, a new church and a food bank, is admirable and (we believe) widely replicable. The orientation of the church kitchen and café to the street, and the uplifting character of the day-lit atrium, speak to the sensitivity of program organization.

A shared vision of what makes a ‘home’ brought together the James North Church community and Indwell, a non-profit housing provider, to redevelop an under-utilized urban site in Hamilton, ON. The project remediated and transformed a run-down commercial plaza and parking lot, replacing it with a four-storey, mixed-use building, that includes space for the growing congregation with three storeys of affordable housing above. The project has quickly become a neighbourhood landmark and a social hub for the community.

The contemporary church focuses on neighbourly hospitality and sports ministries, and the new building also provides 45 affordable apartments for households, including seniors and low income families facing displacement from an area undergoing rapid gentrification.

The building is one of the largest mixed use projects in Canada designed to the Passive House standard. Its low energy requirements reduce utility costs for tenants, while the energy recovery ventilators improve indoor environmental quality through controlled supply and filtration of fresh air.

Sobotec Ltd. supplied and installed the complete rain screen wall assembly, including A/V membrane, thermally-broken sub-framing, insulation and aluminum composite panels for the project. The brick cladding was supplied by Thames Valley Brick & Tile.

An atrium cuts through the centre of the church facilities, its large Kalwall Skyroof® flooding the interior with natural light.

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Architect  Invizij Architects Inc.
  • Owner/Developer  Indwell
  • General Contractor  Schilthuis Construction
  • Landscape Architect  N.J. Sinclair
  • Civil Engineer  Walterfedy
  • Mechanical and Electrical Engineer  CK Engineering Inc.
  • Structural engineer  Kalos Engineering Inc.
  • Passive House Standard Consultant  Peel Passive House
  • Photos  Industryous Photography

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building and process energy) = 45.1kwhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building under mnecb 2015 + sb10 = 73.5 %

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

PROTOTYPE LANEWAY HOUSING – University of Toronto, ON

Residential (Small) Award

BSN Architects

Jury Comment: The municipality, the University of Toronto and the design team are all to be commended for attempting this kind of gentle densification in a heritage district. The success of the project enables faculty, staff and other potential residents to benefit from the transportation, commercial and cultural infrastructure already in place in this neighbourhood. The resulting livable lane environment and the remarkable achievement of Passive House performance in such a tight urban context, takes Toronto’s laneway housing to the next level.

These prototypes are the vanguard of 40 laneway and infill homes proposed for the Huron Sussex Neighbourhood, a historic precinct adjacent to the University of Toronto’s downtown campus. The project advances urban intensification in a location well served by public transit and existing municipal infrastructure, while revitalizing and helping to sustain its immediate heritage context.

Mandated to deliver affordable, sustainable housing for family living and co-habitation, the project utilizes a prefabrication approach to reduce community impacts during construction and enhance performance outcomes.

The three prototypes include: 3 bedroom + 2 study (2,100 gross sq.ft.), 2 bedroom + study, (1,100 gross sq.ft.), and 1 bedroom + study, (900 gross sq.ft.). Sympathetic to scale, massing, and neighbourhood context, the prototypes provide ‘accessibility through proximity’ and are clustered to create a shared outdoor courtyard and to initiate a ‘Living Laneway’ concept with homes accessed from the lane.

Designed using Passive House (PH) principles and all-wood construction, the project optimizes prefabrication and on-site assembly methods and utilizes PH-certified wall panels (R-45) with factory- installed windows (R-7), structural insulated panels (R-54) for the roof, and a shallow super-insulated GEO-Passive slab foundation system (R-24) that minimizes site operations.

Detail of Passive House certified window and thermally-treated ash cladding. Supplied by CFP Woods,  the ash cladding exhibits numerous grain patterns while displaying the natural beauty of its rich brown colour tones. Left to weather naturally, it will turn a beautiful patina grey.

Guelph Solar installed LG 365 Watt solar panels for the U of T Laneway Houses.

Legalett provided three engineered GEO-Passive Slabs with ThermaSill PH thresholds, as well as sub grade preparation supervision for this challenging high density urban fill site with zero clearance lot lines.

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building and process energy) = 47.3KWhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building under ASHRAE 90.1 = 54%
  • Water consumption from municipal sources = 44,880 litres/occupant/year
  • Reduction in water consumption relative to reference building under LEED = 51%
  • Regional materials (800km radius) by value = 15.25%
  • Construction waste diverted from landfill = 85%

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Architect  BSN Architects
  • Owner/Developer  University of Toronto
  • General Contractor  Index Construction
  • Civil Engineer  MTE Consultants
  • Electrical Engineer  Runge Engineering
  • Structural and Mechanical Engineer  Local Impact Design
  • Photos  Tom Arban Photography

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

DISTRICT ENERGY PLANT – University of Victoria, Victoria, BC

Commercial/Industrial (Small) Award

DIALOG

Jury Comment: Rehabilitating and repurposing an existing parking lot on the university campus and simultaneously reducing overall campus energy consumption by 10%, this project provides an important showcase for the University’s energy reduction strategy. By engaging students through visibility and transparency, it creates a sense of connection and elevates concern for the critical infrastructure that supports all of our communities. 

The new University of Victoria district energy plant (DEP) replaces and centralizes three outdated boilers and the supporting infrastructure, which were scattered across campus. It provides increased capacity to the campus heating system, and services 32 buildings. The DEP was built on an existing parking lot in the southwest corner of the campus, adjacent to a forest, publicly-accessible botanical gardens, and an interfaith chapel.

This site had been identified as the most appropriate location for a number of reasons during an earlier campus planning exercise. 

The use of the brownfield site minimized the impact on campus ecosystems and also provided adequate space for future expansion should the university decide to increase the DEP’s capacity. This location also makes it easy to connect to nearby buildings not initially part of the district energy loop. In addition, it is directly linked to municipal streets, which allows service vehicles to avoid circumnavigation of the campus ring road.

Massing for the building was driven by a combination of required equipment height clearances (which in turn enhance cross-ventilation and natural ventilation) and a desire to increase visibility of the plant’s inner workings for the public.

The plant has a full output potential of 27.5 MW of thermal heat – enough for 2,000 single-family homes. The plant and network provide 10% energy savings annually, and greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions of 6,500 tonnes/year.

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Owner/Developer  University of Victoria
  • Architect  DIALOG 
  • General Contractor  Farmer Construction
  • Landscape Architect  HAPA Collaborative
  • Civil Engineer  Westbrook Consulting Ltd.
  • Electrical engineer  AES Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineer  FVB Energy Inc.
  • Structural Engineer  RJC Engineering
  • Commissioning Agent  C E S Engineering
  • Photos  Martin Tessler

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building and process energy) = 135KWhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building under ASHRAE 90.1 2007 = 72%
  • Water consumption from municipal sources = 40,970 litres/occupant/year
  • Reduction in water consumption relative to reference building under LEED = 33%
  • Recycled material content by value = 16%
  • Construction waste diverted from landfill = 95.8%

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

BNP PARIBAS OFFICE INTERIOR – Montreal, QC

Interior Design Award

Provencher_Roy

Jury Comment: At a time when the nature of work is in flux, the transformation of six floors of rigorously repetitious 1970s office space into a dynamic, flexible and inspiring workplace provides cause for optimism. The open, collaborative spaces and non-specific perimeter workstations flow through all levels, encouraging mobility and personal choice of working and relaxing environments throughout the day. Sit/stand desks, lighting programmed to support natural circadian rhythms, and 20 living walls contribute further to psychological and physiological wellbeing.

The first project in Canada to be certified under Version 2 of the WELL Building Standard, the new headquarters for BNP Paribas , the French international banking group, exemplifies current best practice in employee-centred office design. To alleviate overcrowding and bring its 140 staff under one roof, the company chose to relocate and refit 140,000 sq.ft. of space spread over six floors of an existing 1970s office building.

From the outset, the aim was to achieve WELL Building certification and to create a dynamic work environment that would promote social interaction and collaboration as well as the health and comfort of occupants. The challenge was to meet the client’s desire for a fluid, flexible, non-Cartesian layout of space within the physical constraints of the existing structure, which included working with the two feet by four feet ceiling grid.

This led to the development of a workplace where the main open spaces are divided into several zones alternating those intended for work, collaboration and rest. Work areas are not assigned; employees can settle wherever they want in the building, or even telecommute. The workstations are arranged at the perimeter, so employees benefit from maximum natural light.  Common spaces are located at the core of the building and include glazed meeting rooms, changing rooms, and sanitary facilities.

To energize the occupied spaces, the strategy was to create what the design team refers to as “organized chaos” through the choice and arrangement of lighting and office furniture. Artificial lighting integrates a variety of high-performance luminaires, adapted to the functions of the different areas with dynamism in mind. As required by WELL, the lighting is designed not to disrupt the occupants‘ circadian rhythms.

The office furniture system includes a spine that integrates all the wiring required. Workstations can be moved along this spine in either direction to modify the space and employees can alternate between sitting and standing positions. Low VOC materials minimize airborne pollutants and 20 living walls help purify the air while enhancing the human biophilic response.

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Architect  Provencher_Roy
  • Owner/Developer  GWL (Great West Life)
  • General Contractor  Avicor Construction
  • Electrical Engineer  Planifitech
  • Other  Make Space Work, Ameublement intérieur
  • Senoir Design  Haworth
  • Photos  David Boyer

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

GRAND THÉÂTRE DE QUÉBEC: CONSERVATION & REHABILITATION – Quebec City, QC

Existing Building Upgrade Award

Lemay and Atelier 21

Jury Comment: A sophisticated resolution of what had originally seemed an insurmountable technical challenge; that of conserving a deteriorating Brutalist concrete masterpiece and the built-in sculptures it contains. The glass veil preserves the character of the original building with a lightness of touch that is both respectful and refreshing. Given the nationwide challenge we face in remediating and reusing so many buildings of this type, this project inspires us to embrace the challenge and simultaneously enrich the urban narrative.

Famed for its brutalist architecture by Victor Prus and entwined with its historic, sculptural mural by Jordi Bonet, the Grand Théâtre de Québec is a prized cultural icon for all Québecers, inaugurated for the Confederation Centennial in 1971. Designed by prominent architect Victor Prus in the Brutalist style, prefabricated concrete interior and exterior walls are the defining architectural elements of the building. In addition, nearly 60% of the interior is covered with an integrated mural by sculptor Jordi Bonet

The existing prefabricated concrete envelope had major condensation and rust issues. The fragility of the mural and the inaccessibility of the concrete anchors required a radical solution. Adding a new glass envelope stopped the deterioration and significantly extended the service life.

Requiring only a prefabricated steel structure and glass infill panels, the solution minimized the use of new materials, left the existing envelope untouched and avoided invasive interior work. Cleverly resting on the existing foundations, the steel framework reduced the use of concrete and site excavation.

The new glass envelope provides and innovative solution from an architectural, structural and mechanical point of view. It also dealt with logistical constraints, including the requirement that the theatre maintain its daytime and evening operations during construction. Noise could not impact rehearsals or performances and construction activity could not hinder building access. In addition, as the mural was connected to the exterior concrete panels, vibration and other potential impacts on the envelope had to be avoided. An integrated design and delivery process was essential to the success of the project.

PROJECT CREDIT

  • Architect  Lemay
  • Associate Architect  Atelier 21
  • Owner/Developer  Le Grand Théâtre de Québec
  • Construction Manager  Pomerleau
  • Landscape Architect  Lemay + Atelier 21
  • Civil Engineer  WSP
  • Electrical, Mechanical, Structural Engineer  WSP
  • Commissioning Agent  Ambioner
  • Other  ELEMA, Metal Presto, Vitrerie Laberge
  • Photos  Stéphane Groleau
  •  

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Recycled materials  The steel used for the new exterior structure has 25% recycled content.
  • Energy Intensity  With the addition of the tempered double envelope, the energy intensity increased from 235.9 KWh/m2/year to 241.6 KWh/m2/year, a 2.39% increase.   
  •  

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

TSAWWASSEN FIRST NATION YOUTH CENTRE – Tsawwassen, BC

Institutional (Small) Award

Mackin Tanaka Architecture

Jury Comment: With the growing concern for the embodied carbon in our built environment, this small building for the Tsawwassen First Nation stands out for its commitment to that cause. In fact, its widespread use of wood and its projected low operating energy demand, may make the building carbon negative for a decade or more. In addition to its low environmental impact, the location next to the Salish Sea and on the Pacific flight path for migratory birds, make it an invaluable teaching tool for Indigenous youth – and for all of us.

This community centre for young people and their families provides spaces for drop-in and scheduled programs and community gatherings. Located on treaty lands south of Vancouver, the waterfront site is part of a unique cultural and ecological area, the meeting place of cultures and ecologies.

The design of the two-storey building bridges tradition and modernity, its narrative unfolding through its form, structure, materials and relationship to site. In this way, it teaches future leaders 4,000 year old lessons about stewardship of the land and sea.

An interactive design process, involving children, teens, leadership, and artists guided the development of the program and the approach to building design. Among the program elements that emerged from this collaborative process were, climbing walls, art and music studios, MMA and weight room areas, a teen lounge and an outdoor oriented activity space for the younger set. TFN citizens of all ages expressed their commitment to maintaining the health of their traditional lands and using environmentally responsible and durable materials and systems for their new building.

The gymnasium on the second floor with a Sportec underlayment 4 mm overlaid with Sportec UNI classic 4mm. Damtec wave 3D 17/8 was installed as a resilient layer (acoustic insulation under screed) over the entire second floor, with 6 mm Damtec estra installed as a de-coupler strip around all wall perimeters, logs, MEP routing etc. Sportec and Damtec supplied by Ideal Fit. 

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Architect  Mackin Tanaka Architecture
  • Owner / Developer  Tsawwassen First Nation
  • General Contractor  Converge Construction
  • Landscape Architect  Zhiwei Lu
  • Civil Engineer  Webster Engineering Ltd.
  • Electrical/ Mechanical Engineer  MCW Consultants Ltd.
  • Timber construction  Durfeld Log & Timber
  • Photos  Ema Peter and Mitch Creek

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building and process energy from hydro-electric sources) = 180 KWhr/m2/year
  • Water consumption from municipal sources = 86,424 litres/occupant/year
  • Reduction in water consumption relative to reference building under LEED v4 = 18%

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

UBC OKANAGAN, SKEENA RESIDENCE – University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna BC

Residential (Large) Award (Sponsored by Inline Fiberglass)

Public Architecture + Communication

Jury Comments: Not only does Passive House certification take this building beyond Code in terms of energy performance; it achieves this while still addressing issues of context and community. The relationship to its surroundings is carefully considered, as is the design an organization of its common spaces. Making successive cohorts of students aware of the superior quality of a Passive House environment – and so raising their expectations, may be the most significant contribution of this project.

This new Passive House certified residence accommodates 220 students within five floors of light wood frame construction, above a concrete ground floor that contains common areas, amenity and service spaces. The building completes an ensemble of residence buildings encircling the central green space on campus – known as Commons Field.

The five identical residential floors include shared bathrooms flanked by two bedrooms. This layout allows space for quiet study when required. Additionally, each floor contains both a study lounge and a house lounge with views of the surrounding mountains, the latter equipped with a kitchenette, dining table and couches. Locating these spaces at opposite ends of the floor ensures that quiet study is not interrupted by noise from the social home lounge.

The first level includes a large laundry room adjacent to the student lounge. Separated by a glass wall, the relationship between the two spaces encourages chance meetings and spontaneous gatherings. Moreover, the transparency offers passive surveillance, or visibility that promotes a sense of security.

The Passive House goal of minimal energy use for heating and cooling informed many design choices. Given that irregular forms with multiple indentations and corners, or projections such as steps, overhangs, or canopies create challenges for insulation, airtightness and the elimination of thermal bridging, a simple and efficient rectilinear volume performs best.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

A BLANKET OF WARMTH – Star Blanket Cree Nation, SK

Technical Award

MacPherson Engineering Inc.

Jury Comment: “This simple, affordable and highly transferable design solution to the substandard indoor environmental quality in much of the First Nations housing stock across the country, is notable for its collaborative approach and the inspiration it takes from traditional Aboriginal structures. The transition from forced air to radiant heat brings multiple benefits, with a payback period of less than 10 years.”

To address the mould issue, MacPherson Engineering partnered with universities, industry leaders, psychologists, Knowledge Keepers, engineers, and businesses. The project needed to be affordable, ecofriendly, incorporate Indigenous knowledge, and create positive social values of inclusion, cooperation, and respect.

The project broadened responsible consumption and production with the installation of the hybrid heating system on 75% of the concrete perimeter basement walls.

Aligning with the United Nations goals, the retrofitting of conventional HVAC with a system that was simple to install and operate improved efficiency and sustainability.

After installation, a comparative study was done, proving that radiant heating is a feasible solution to address air quality, thermal comfort, and energy use and humidity problems, performing much better than traditional HVAC systems. 

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Owner / Developer  Star Blanket Cree Nation
  • Mechanical Engineer  MacPherson Engineering Inc.
  • Plumbing and Heating  Anaquod Plumbing and Heating
  • Construction  J McNaughton Construction
  • University of Regina  Dr Arm Henni & Capstone students
  • Photos  Aura Lee MacPherson

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

BARRETT CENTRE FOR TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION – Humber College, Toronto, ON

Institutional (Large) Award

Perkins&Will

Jury Comment: This project is significant for its innovative use of parametric software; not for abstract form-making, but for taking a first principles approach to passive design.  In many cases, the LEED Platinum and Net Zero ambitions for the project would have resulted in an uninspiring box-like form. Instead, the result can be considered a kind of ‘place and performance-based regionalism’. The flexible arrangement of learning spaces, the bright and colourful interiors and park-like accessible roof all enrich the experience of this building, within its bland suburban context.

This net-zero energy building is a first for Humber College and is targetting LEED Platinum certification. The facility sets a precedent for innovation in automated manufacturing and human-centred solutions, omitting classrooms entirely. Instead, flexible project modules provide space for fabrication and technical zones for students, faculty, and industry to explore, research and fabricate together.

The experience of the BCTI begins the moment one steps onto campus. The building acts as a dramatic portal; its dynamic glazed lobby and cantilevered form creating a new focus for student life. The BCTI features active and social spaces like interactive demonstration areas and flexible open-concept gathering areas.

These spaces are designed to enable a free exchange of information and ideas to inspire an informal and active learning experience. The central atrium offers an immediate connection to the outdoors through views to surrounding landscaped spaces and campus and ample access to natural light. The building achieves net zero energy through a conservation first approach, driven by parametric analysis of solar radiation, daylight penetration, natural ventilation and envelope optimization, supplemented by a 700 kW solar PV array located on an adjacent parking structure. Beyond this, the project embodies a holistic approach to sustainability, in alignment with the College’s values: green rooftop teaching spaces, urban agriculture pods, and visible high-performance building systems that foster a culture of environmental stewardship as a vital aspect of entrepreneurial innovation. Materials have been chosen for low environmental impact, occupant health and wellbeing, durability and climate change resilience.

The parametric modelling analysis optimized both the massing and envelope resulting in a highly insulated façade, concrete floors acting as thermal mass in the lobby, and also influenced the distinctive form of the building. A window-to-wall ratio of 40% emphasizes glazing where daylight is beneficial to support occupant health, particular in active learning spaces, collaboration zones and circulation paths. Brise Soleil shading devices on the south façade mitigate heat gain and glare, while a thermal chimney enables natural ventilation during more temperate seasons.

The partly vegetated roof contributes to stormwater retention. Around the building exterior the ACO KlassikDrain handles stormwater collection in the form of an aesthetically pleasing linear trench drain which helps to maintain smooth surface grading while preserving building accessibility. With proven performance in winter conditions, it also provides LEED credit eligibility for regional manufacturing.

A mix of cladding was used on the project. CBC Specialty Metals supplied through Bothwell-Accurate Co. Inc the VMZINC® ANTHRA-ZINC® STRAT Interlocking Panels, having expected lifespan of over 100 years. Quarried in Ontario, Adair natural limestone by Arriscraft, used around the base of the building, is unique in the industry offering unparalleled distinction and longevity for commercial projects.

The building achieves net zero energy through a conservation first approach, driven by analysis of solar radiation, daylight penetration, natural ventilation and envelope optimization. Lochinvar by Aqua-Tech supplied two Crest Condensing Boilers Model FBN1751 for space heating and domestic hot water, and a GVC65JR Hot Water Generator c/w Double Wall Tube Bundle for indirect domestic hot water demand.

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Architect  Perkins+Will
  • Owner/Developer  Humber College
  • General Contractor  Bird Construction
  • Landscape Architect Brodie And Associates
  • Civil Engineer  ExP
  • Electrical/ Mechanical Engineer  MCW Consultants
  • Structural engineer  Thornton Tomasetti
  • LEED Consultant  Fluent
  • Building Envelope  RDH
  • Acoustics, Noise and Vibration  Aerocoustics
  • Accessibility  Designable Environments
  • Building Code  LRI
  • Photos: Scott Norsworthy (photo 4), Tom Arban Photography (photos 1, 3 and 5), Joe Markovic Photography (photo 2)

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building and process energy) = 99.8 KWhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building =
  • 100% (all energy supplied by renewables)
  • Water consumption from municipal sources = 1,559 litres/occupant/year
  • Reduction in water consumption relative to reference building
  • under LEED = 40%
  • Recycled material content by value = 24%
  • Regional materials (800km radius) by value = 34%
  • Construction waste diverted from landfill = 85.3%
  •  

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.

80 ATLANTIC – Toronto, ON

Commercial/Industrial (Large) Award (sponsored by Mitsubishi Electric Sales Canada Inc.)

BPD Quadrangle

Jury Comment: In a market where commercial buildings of this size and type were once common, this project sends a signal that mass wood construction is once again a viable and highly desirable option. The warmth of the exposed wood and high quality of interior daylighting contribute to a beautiful working environment. With its glass exterior, the building makes a striking and poignant complement to its historic Brick and beam neighbor, reinforcing the idea that both aesthetically and technically, mass wood can be part of a more sustainable future.

Ontario’s first mass timber commercial building in a generation, 80 Atlantic sets an important precedent for the region and for this market sector. Located next to 60 Atlantic, a warehouse renovation and expansion by the same architect, the two projects now form the nucleus of a creative hub that is developing in Toronto’s Liberty Village.

80 Atlantic combines four storeys of office space, constructed in Canadian-sourced mass timber, over a single-storey retail podium, constructed in concrete.  The project goals were to design an office building that would build on the success of 60 Atlantic, demonstrate leadership in the rapidly developing field of mass timber, and to attract creative tenants. Motivated by recent changes to the Ontario Building Code allowing for commercial wood buildings up to six storeys, the team introduced a new ‘Post and Beam 2.0’ typology.

80 Atlantic mixes the warmth, beauty and large, open spans of a converted industrial building with the environmental and technological advantages of a Class-A office building, including airtight construction, energy efficiency, good acoustics and built-in technologies.

The project offers the materially raw and easily reconfigurable environment popular with new economy tenants, but without its deficits: the dust, draughts, poor acoustics, energy inefficiency, and the obtrusively placed pipes and cables. Punched windows echo the architecture of surrounding heritage buildings and maintain an overall window-to-wall ratio of 40%.

A south-facing curtain wall mitigates the building’s mass and scale, while showcasing the mass timber interiors to passersby. Rather than being exposed within the occupied spaces, HVAC ducts, integrated into the floor plenum, keep the air moving and temperatures comfortable. The electrical and telecommunications systems are also below the floor, resulting in a highly adaptable and uncluttered space. Unobscured by ducts or bulkheads, the natural wood columns and ceilings are on display throughout.

Building users have more control over their environment than in a typical office setting, thanks to operable windows which are easily accessible to 30% of occupants and interior shading control through user operated blinds.

Significant energy savings stem from an energy recovery ventilator with 88% sensible recovery serving the rooftop units and condensing boilers with a thermal seasonal efficiency of 90%. High-performance LED lighting and occupancy sensors reduce the energy required to light the space by more than 50% compared to the code referenced standard.

The buff-coloured surface of the Ceramitex® rainscreen and the scale of the punched windows honour the industrial brick vernacular of the area. The 19,455 sq ft. of thin sintered ceramic is manufactured with the fiberglass-reinforced mesh backing that is adhered to the Elemex® Unity® Attachment Technology, making it a durable and versatile choice.

PROJECT PERFORMANCE

  • Energy intensity (building) = 104KWhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity (process) = 46KWhr/m2/year
  • Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building
  • under ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 = 32.3%
  • Water consumption from municipal sources = 4,712 litres/occupant/year
  • Reduction in water consumption relative to reference building under LEED = 23%

PROJECT CREDITS

  • Owner  Hullmark Developments Ltd and BentallGreenOak
  • Architect  BDP Quadrangle
  • General Contractor  Eastern Construction
  • Landscape Architect  Vertechs Design Inc.
  • Civil Engineer  R V Anderson Associates
  • Electrical and Mechanical Engineers  Smith + Andersen
  • Structural Engineer  RJC Engineers
  • Commissioning Agent  RWDI
  • Building Envelope Consultant  RDH Building Science 
  • Heritage Envelope Consultant  Philip Goldsmith Architect
  • Ceramitex® Facade Installer  Ontario Panelization
  • Ceramitex® Facade Manufacturer  Elemex Architectural Facade Systems
  • Photos  Doublespace Photography and Bob Gundu
  •  

SUBSCRIBE TO THE DIGITAL OR PRINT ISSUE OF SABMAGAZINE FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE.