Issue 07 | Fall - Winter  2011

 

Captain Kidd’s Terrace

LEED Platinum house uses existing foundation and salvaged materials

This low-cost, 1,190sf, LEED Platinum house is sited on an existing 20-year-old foundation on pedestrian-oriented Protection Island, a five minute passenger ferry ride from Downtown Nanaimo.   read more

GREEN CLEANING SOLUTIONS

When Less is More

Between 1950 and 2000, the average size of a North American house increased from about 800sf to about 2,500sf. This has been a reflection of the mass movement of people from inner cities to suburbs, from small single-family lots, to much larger ones. But for many reasons, the migratory trend is beginning to reverse, and many people are now seeking the quality of life that contemporary urban environments provide.

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HOME AND STUDIO FOR AN URBAN MONK


This small live/work addition to a Montreal
row house represents a highly personal response to some big questions. With environmental responsibility his highest priority, owner Mario Lafrenais, chose to build the project himself, in order to facilitate maximum use of reclaimed materials and alternative energy systems, something that would have been much more difficult within the constraints of conventional commercially-driven building delivery systems.

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RAIN WATER HARVESTING

Capture, re-use, regulations

Many homeowners are already reducing their water consumption having retrofitted their home with water-conserving plumbing fixtures. They have accepted the soft touch of new showerheads over the powerful needle spray, and they are familiar with automatic-eye hand washing, dual-flush toilets and waterless urinals.

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OLD DAY PLASTERS, NEW DAY DESIGN

Even in the innovative and rapidly changing world of green building, some of the old ways and traditional materials are often the best. For thousands of years, natural clay and lime plasters have been used to create beautiful and long-lasting interior and exterior finishes. While these materials continue to be used extensively throughout the world, they have been largely replaced in North America by cement and acrylic stuccos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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